With a flood of new services and products continuously and relentlessly entering the market, we’re always being encouraged to take a big step to new platforms; try it out, take it for a spin. Sometimes only for a slight improvement or even worse, a few steps backward.

So to avoid the latter, what are some things that every team should consider before implementing or even suggesting a change in technology, software, or workflow? Whilst this list isn’t exhaustive, here are 3 key questions to get you started.

What’s my motivation for introducing a new tool or technology?

Some people enjoy constantly refining and reiterating processes and systems. This is a fantastic talent that not everyone will naturally have but there is not always value in change for the sake of change. Take a step back and really ask yourself why bringing a new tool into your teams workflow is needed. The answer to this question is crucial. It will either stop you from making the decision to go forward or it will be the key thing you need to communicate to your team in order to make a case for change.

Is it a technology problem or a people problem?

Studies have been done to show that businesses’ expectations often go unmet when implementing a new CRM system. While there are some terrible systems out there (thank god for SalesSeek), many CRM systems are actually pretty solid. They deliver the same key infrastructure for a company, giving the ability to track relationships with companies, individuals, and deals, at the same time they have their differences and it’s important to find one that suits you. But! What is found to be the problem is not the technology, it’s the customer reps (CSRs), this segment from a Gallup post explains.

…the top seven CSRs work with customers so well that every customer they interact with feels more loyal to the company after talking with them. Thus, they create tremendous value for their employer. Customers that talk with the three worst CRS have a far different experience. These CSRs don’t create value — they destroy it, by making 100% of the customers they handle less loyal to the company.

What this really should bring to your attention is a more serious question. Have you hired for talent? Some people have the natural ability to offer the best customer service and some people learn the skills and knowledge but will never reach their full potential because they lack a certain nature. While it is true that a CRM can allow anyone to sit in the chair of a customer support person, allowing them to see the complete history of the relationship, it doesn’t mean that that person will be able to continue to create a strong bond with that customer. In fact, as Gallup states, it could destroy the relationship all together.

Is there actually good reason to change?

After answering these two questions, you’re going to be much more equipped to address this final one. Is it really worth it? Is your current technology holding you back and would a change be a significant part of the solution?

It’s not uncommon to find great new technology solutions but it is common to find that people make uninformed decisions based on flawed reasoning. The best way to get your team onboard with a new workflow, system, or technology is to ask yourself these key questionsand let it go when it’s not worth the change. There’s always the next time.